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This podcast's purpose is to bring together the field of neuroprosthetics / brain machine interfaces / brain implants in an understandable conversation about the current topics and breakthroughs. We hope to replace needing to read scientific papers on new research in an easy to digest way. Then people can share thoughts or ideas to facilitate 'idea sex' to make the field of brain implants a smaller and more personal space

Apr 15, 2019

Ian Baumgart is a Biomedical Engineering Master’s student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He currently conducts research in Doctor Kip Ludwig’s Neural Engineering Laboratory. Baumgart’s current project focuses on the Injectrode, which is an injectable pre-polymer that can act as a conductor throughout the body along with nerves.

Top Three Takeaways:

  1. The Injectrode is basically liquid pre-polymer with conductive particles that are completely injectable.
  2. The benefits of this procedure involve the fact that it is minimally invasive—it can be injected into deep structures relatively easily. The injectrode is softer and conforms better than a wire.
  3. Baumgart’s team hopes to develop insulation for the injectrode; he would also like to increase the shelf-life of the injectrode and characterize its composition.

Show Notes:

[0:00] Ladan introduces the NER Conference he attended in March of 2019 and explains how he conducted interviews at the poster sessions.

[1:15] Ian Baumgart introduces himself from the University of Wisconsin-Madison working in Doctor Kip Ludwig’s Neural Engineering Laboratory.

[1:30] Baumgart introduces the Injectrode which is basically liquid pre-polymer with conductive particles that is completely injectable.

[2:15] His team eventually hopes to further develop the surgical aspect of the procedure to better administer the Injetctrode.

[2:30] Baumgart goes into the details concerning the setup of the experiment and the similarities observed throughout testing.

[3:40] The benefits of this procedure involve the fact that it is minimally invasive—it can be injected into deep structures relatively easily. The injectrode is softer and conforms better than a wire.

[4:45] The physical properties have yet to be characterized in the Injectrode.

[5:25] Baumgart’s team hopes to develop insulation for the injectrode; he would also like to increase the shelf-life of the injectrode and characterize its composition.

[6:00] His paper is currently in the Bio Archive and will be published soon; its name is A Truly Injectable Neural Stimulation Electrode Made from an In-Body Curing Polymer/Metal Composite.