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This podcast's purpose is to bring together the field of neuroprosthetics / brain machine interfaces / brain implants in an understandable conversation about the current topics and breakthroughs. We hope to replace needing to read scientific papers on new research in an easy to digest way. Then people can share thoughts or ideas to facilitate 'idea sex' to make the field of brain implants a smaller and more personal space

Apr 22, 2019

Doctor Alejandra Gonzalez is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Texas-Dallas that works in the fields of neurotechnology. She currently focuses on how she can develop graphing fibers that have better electrochemical properties for implantable devices.

Top Three Takeaways:

  1. Her team is creating graphing fibers without good electrochemical properties and good mechanical properties to use as electrical interfaces in peripheral nerves.
  2. Conventional electrodes have charge capacities that range from 0.05-0.2 mC per centimeter squared, and conventional graphing fibers have one of 300 mC per centimeter squared.
  3. She mentions how it sometimes is difficult to combine the fields of neurology and engineering.

Show Notes:

[00:00] Ladan introduces the episode from a recent neural engineering conference he attended in March of 2019.

[1:15] Alejandra Gonzalez introduces herself from University of Texas-Dallas as a postdoctoral fellow. The poster covers the fabrication of high performance of graphing electrodes for the use of interfaces.

[1:45] Her team is creating graphing fibers without good electrochemical properties and good mechanical properties to use as electrical interfaces in peripheral nerves.

[2:10] Conventional electrodes have charge capacities that range from 0.05-0.2 mC per centimeter squared, and conventional graphing fibers have one of 300 mC per centimeter squared.

[2:35] Metallic coatings have been added to the fibers to improve their charge capacities to 940 mC per centimeter squared.

[3:00] The design of Gonzalez’s fibers reduce impedance and improve electrical flow.

[3:25] The fibers can be in thinner than 20 micrometers in diameter.

[4:00] Gonzalez pictures this technology being used as cuffs around peripheral nerves.

[4:30] She mentions how it sometimes is difficult to combine the fields of neurology and engineering.